A Gen Z Goth Revival Is Here, Thanks to Wednesday Addams

At first glance, Wednesday Addams is not who you’d associate with as an icon for Gen Z. With a disgust for human connection, there’s a multitude of reasons why she still finds herself to be a lonely outcast in a school that’s meant for outcasts. Atwood designed the costumes with a strong intention to push that striking difference. Wednesday’s dress in the first episode was in the style of Charles Addams with a large, sharply pointed white collar. This really contrasts her against what we see from the other students in traditional, American teen fashions.”

Atwood isn’t wrong about the traditional teen fashions. On-screen portrayals of my generation are largely littered with clashing prints, beaded phone cases, and a penchant for color. It’s not that I’m surprised at Wednesday‘s success, as Burton has created a new world for the Addams family that seems impossible not to be fascinated with. It’s that we’ve become used to seeing characters from shows like Euphoria and Sex Lives Of College Girls making impactful stylistic connections with younger audiences, and Wednesday can feel a little out of left field. Before this series was released, I initially thought such a seemingly morbid character wouldn’t entirely resonate with the masses as much as it has, but I’ve never been happier to be proven wrong.

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